Msw Personal Statement Usc

As part of your application for admission to the USC Master of Social Work program, please submit a Statement of Purpose that encapsulates your motivation in seeking an MSW. Your statement should demonstrate an ability to synthesize your professional/personal experiences and desire to enter the field of social work. This statement will be used to assess your creativity, critical thinking, self-awareness and writing skills. Use the following questions as a guide for topics to address within the statement and not a format for your statement. Please note your statement of purpose must be 5 double-spaced pages in length, with 1-inch margins, and 12 point Times New Roman font. You must upload the Statement of Purpose to the Supporting Documents section of the online Graduate Admissions Application.

Describe your understanding of the social work profession and its core values. How have you incorporated social work values in your human service experiences and interactions with others?

What significant relationships and life experiences have you had in giving or receiving help that have motivated you to enter the field of social work?

What personal qualities equip you for the social work profession? Discuss your experiences and feelings about working with populations different from your own.

The USC School of Social Work is dedicated to providing excellent graduate education for people destined to create social change. What social welfare areas interest you and why? What social problem most concerns you that might be addressed with an MSW?

Discuss your undergraduate/graduate academic experience and include a description of your academic strengths and weaknesses. Please explain any grade deficiencies and what you have done to improve them.

Graduate education can be a rigorous and costly endeavor. How do you plan to prepare for this experience? Are there any health conditions or physical limitations that will impact your participation in graduate study and field work?

Statement of Purpose

My desire to pursue a career in the field of social work stemmed from the outcome of my parallel experience of learning about D.V. in an undergraduate course and of becoming an active volunteer within a non-profit organization where I was able to care for child victims of D.V.

I began volunteering in the department of childcare at the non-profit organization, North County Lifeline (NCL), with the objective of gaining further familiarity in working with children from disadvantaged backgrounds. Initially I was not informed that the children I was taking care of were victims of D.V. and upon entry what I observed were children who were timid, refraining from making eye contact, and uttering nothing more than a rare yes or no. Although I perceived their actions as a deviation from that of a 'normal' child, I found myself drawing similarities in their behavior and my childhood self-which actually helped me with the formation of establishing trusting relationships with the children. However, the resurfacing of my childhood was evermore ignited by my course study on what a violent home setting can encompass. I noticed myself checking off almost every section from the power and control wheel when comparing the given scenarios to my family home. Memories of my own home interview with a social worker about possible violence and abuse in my home began to reemerge. I began drawing connections on the effects that D.V. can have on children, with not only my personal self, but with that of the children I was taking care of. I became motivated to inquire further about the each child's background and to research how to work with children who have lived in D.V. setting, becoming familiar with effective and engaging positive activities.

My realization and acceptance of my first-hand experience with D.V., which I had normalized as a child, has magnified my interest in pursuing a meaningful career in helping children and families who are suffering from any form of abuse.

I believe the role of a social worker is to serve and empower individuals, groups, and communities, who continue to face social injustice, inequality and the many shapes and shades of abuse, in order to help restore a greater sense of human and social well-being. Positive social change becomes a reality with the adherence to mutual social work core values: social justice, respect, reliability, honesty, trust, empathy, competency, and recognition of the importance of human relationships for a healthy life. I believe these values set guidelines for being an effective social worker, where my personal implementation of these core values allowed for success in my interactions with co-workers and clients.

At NCL I have been able to utilize my bilingual skill of speaking both English and Spanish, my cultural background and knowledge on different Hispanic communities, and my D.V. background to better asses and communicate with clients. My field-work knowledge has expanded progressively, serving over five hundred hours with different populations. I became multi-trained among many diverse programs that have allowed me to gain exposure and experience among children and mothers who have been victims of D.V., men who have been perpetrators of D.V., young adults exiting the foster care system, families who are homeless under HUD regulations, and people who lack formal education, speak only Spanish, are unemployed, are facing housing discrimination, identify with a certain race or ethnic minority, and/or are suffering from poverty. With such a wide scope of clientele I learned to embrace and utilize the core values of social work.

When working with clients I find it necessary to treat each individual with the same amount of respect; however, the way in which I interact with clients is specific to that individual, so as to from an initial appointment begin to build rapport. I remember the feeling of satisfaction from being able to assist an elderly Hispanic Spanish speaking woman in filling out forms for her public benefits applications, due to her inability to both read and write. I was able to create a positive first impression and atmosphere, where she felt comfortable enough to trust me with her personal information as I explained the different forms. She readily signed all the necessary forms, without questioning my experience as a volunteer, which I soon found out to be something common among clients, especially Spanish speaking clients. As a professional figure in the field, even with my disclosure of being a volunteer, clients placed great amount of responsibility that I had a desire and obligation to live up to. Helping clients with public benefit applications required me to become more familiar with policies and documentations to process cases, which has made me a more competent advocate.

However, one population I had difficulty relating to were homeless clients, because I had a hard time imagining how it must feel to live on the streets, in my car, or in a shelter, with no form of income. The social injustice that these clients faced is grave, and is only magnified by other additional variable: immigration status, age, disability, and etc. I came to develop a great sense of empathy for individuals and families with these living circumstances, which made it very difficult to be honest about the limited and specific funding NCL offered for housing. I had to do a lot of research on different agencies that would be capable of assisting individuals with motel vouchers, rental deposits, and ect., which had me become more knowledgeable about housing options and regulations. When returning calls from the intake line, within the first few seconds I could perceive the amount of gratitude and relief individuals felt in getting a call back, trying to establish a human connection, where their specific situation mattered. The promise of working with a case manager compared to handing them a life boat. I have found that the active implementation of social work values when working with all types of clients or co-workers allows for stronger relationships to be built, relationships which foster positive and fulfilling human interactions.

Interacting with many different populations and offering different services opened up my eyes to the vast unmet social needs by public programs. I analyzed how the lack of social programs not only influenced the life of the adult, but that of their children as well. Helping children and family once more became my prime focus and has allowed me to narrow my career goal in the field of social work.

Currently I am striving to become a competent child welfare social worker, where I will be capable of personally aiding children who are victims of abuse and neglect. The ability to provide direct support and resources for children and families who are living under difficult and abusive circumstances is something not only ultimately rewarding, but something that can foster social change. Each child who suffers abuse is affected in some manner, and regardless of whether the reality or graveness of the abuse is processed, the experience of trauma remains. Assisting children in receiving aid and counseling services promotes personal trauma resilience. With personal progress, children, when confronted with critical life choices, are given the possibility to elect a different healthy lifestyle than the one previously experienced. Child victims of neglect and abuse are able to become healthy members of society; they are able to become social agents of change for their communities at large.

As a potential MSW graduate student I am interested in analyzing how a child's removal from their home setting influences their trauma resilience, and to what extent different housing placements compare. When a child is removed from the home there is the justification that the decision was made in the best interest of the child. I feel that is a valid reason, but the wording allows for each choice made to be very subjective. In undertaking this MSW program I hope to gain a better understanding of the practice methods and service used in the community by CWS. In order to become competent in this field of work I understand that I need to pursue more formal education. In order to be able to have so much influence over the life of an abused and/or neglected child there needs I need to have a better understanding of practice methods that protect children.

I am confident that I will continue to be scholastically successful in obtaining an MSW degree. I have been able to receive consistent grades across all subjects through my undergraduate academia. My Sociology major has explored different issues of inequality that are essential to understanding social life and my Spanish minor has allowed me to refine my Spanish writing technical skills and further my cultural competency. The subjects that I tend to struggle with are math, biology, and physics, all of which will just require more time for me to be able to grasp their respective theories and methods. However, I have the energy and determination to begin learning new relevant social work material and am eager to be exposed to a different community through service learning.

I am prepared to make the necessary arrangements to move to University Park and begin the next stage in my life. I do not have any health conditions or social obligations that would impede my acceptance to your MSW program. I have not yet decided if I would like to live on campus; however, I do plan on saving money specifically for housing up until fall of next year. I have a genuine interest and passion in becoming an effective and competent social agent of change, by providing support and resources, as a compassionate and empathetic social worker, for children and families who continue to face social injustice, inequality, and the many shapes and shades of abuse.

I redrafted my statement of purpose for the MSW program I applying to. Please give me critical feedback. Do you think I covered all the required topics effectively? Is there something that really needs improvement? Any type of feedback is welcomed.

Statement of Purpose Requirements:

As part of your application for admission to the USC Master of Social Work program, please submit a Statement of Purpose that encapsulates your motivation in seeking an MSW. Your statement should demonstrate an ability to synthesize your professional/personal experiences and desire to enter the field of social work. This statement will be used to assess your creativity, critical thinking, self-awareness and writing skills. Use the following questions as a guide for topics to address within the statement and not a format for your statement. Please note your statement of purpose must be 5 double-spaced pages in length, with 1-inch margins, and 12 point Times New Roman font. You must upload the Statement of Purpose to the Supporting Documents section of the online Graduate Admissions Application.

Describe your understanding of the social work profession and its core values. How have you incorporated social work values in your human service experiences and interactions with others?

What significant relationships and life experiences have you had in giving or receiving help that have motivated you to enter the field of social work?

What personal qualities equip you for the social work profession? Discuss your experiences and feelings about working with populations different from your own.

The USC School of Social Work is dedicated to providing excellent graduate education for people destined to create social change. What social welfare areas interest you and why? What social problem most concerns you that might be addressed with an MSW?

Discuss your undergraduate/graduate academic experience and include a description of your academic strengths and weaknesses. Please explain any grade deficiencies and what you have done to improve them.

Graduate education can be a rigorous and costly endeavor. How do you plan to prepare for this experience? Are there any health conditions or physical limitations that will impact your participation in graduate study and field work?

Statement of Purpose

I believe that so much of our life is influenced by our childhood experiences. Regardless of whether we are ever able to comprehend fully different events, our emotions and sentiments are real. From birth we are placed in a social location among variables that have us either more susceptible to living a healthy or dysfunctional life. Society continues to create wide forms of social injustice that hinder progressive change towards individual well-being and human equality. However, the aspiration of gradually overcoming different critical lived experiences, although difficult, becomes a possibility if there is help and support. My desire is to be able to provide genuine aid to populations who are victims of abuse, to become an agent of positive social change, as a social worker, for not only individuals, but also for my community as a whole.

My interest in social work began as I volunteered at Reidy Creek Elementary School, where I perceived the academic imbalance between the predominately Caucasian middle-class population of children and the small percentage of lower-income Hispanic children. Being bilingual and working with the reading club I was able to frequently assist Hispanic children who were not only below their grade's reading level, but also who at times had low self-esteem. I was able to encourage self-worth and self-confidence among the children who at times saw themselves as inferior to others. I was also able to communicate with their respective parents in English or Spanish the need to be further involved in their child's life. Specifically I remember a young boy named Darian who was loud, impulsive, and barely tolerated by the other supervisors. Although he was challenging to work with I was able to have him focus on reading as I related the stories to his personal interests, which allowed me to gain a better understanding of who he was, what he valued, and what his family environment was like. I saw how important his mother's attention and approval were to him so I made an effort to have his mother come in to the reading club and encourage him to excel. Darian was able to focus, gain self-confidence, and calm down when interacting with others, which had the principal of the school take notice and congratulate him on all his progress. I enjoyed working with Darian and the other children, helping them progress not only academically, but also in building a positive self-image that allowed them to move forward.

In order to enhance my knowledge on how to help and interact with children from different backgrounds I began volunteering with the non-profit North County Lifeline. I began taking care of children who were witnesses of Domestic Violence (D.V.) and whose mothers were attending the victim D.V. classes offered by the organization. Throughout my time with the children I quickly began to see in them a reflection of my childhood self: introvert, unable to make eye contact, and uttering nothing more than a rare yes or no. Different memories from my childhood started to emerge, and with the parallel D.V. undergraduate course I was taking, I soon began to realize how I had been a victim of D.V. I began to recall the day the social worker came into my home and interviewed me over the report of abuse, with the possibility of removing me from my home. I at the time, and many years after, did not see myself as a victim of abuse; I had normalized everything that occurred in my home. Not until I started to see how I could check off all segments in the power in control wheel did I start to realize and fully accept that I had suffered physical, emotional, and psychological abuse from my father. Although I struggled with that realization, being able to interact with the children helped me heal and showed me that I could give them a support and sense of security that I lacked. I was able to establish trusting relationships with the children, and saw it as a victory any time I was able to get a smile or a laugh. This experience cemented my desire to pursue a career in helping children and families.

My stay at North County Lifeline expanded with my growing motivation to be able to understand families who had suffered D.V. I soon found out that the ability to help with the D.V. victim and perpetrator sessions was a privilege solely granted to me. In the counseling department only graduate students were received as interns; however, my knowledge on the topic, responsible nature, genuine interest, and courage in asking had shown initiative to my supervisor, who readily accepted and allowed me to sit in the D.V. sessions and help with the respective case notes. During the sessions I was able to gain a further understanding on the thought process of victims and perpetrators of D.V., while at the same time drawing connections between my personal childhood and my parents. I was able to process further my personal life, and at the same time gain a more wholesome form of empathy for all parties involved. I saw first hand how effective the D.V. sessions were for some clients and was happy that I could be there to witness the progressive change.

My growing passion to help different families expanded the populations I became in contact and soon familiar with. At North County Lifeline over the relatively short period of eight months I was able to volunteer over five-hundred hours, becoming cross trained in different programs. I have been able to provide assistance to families and individuals who were homeless, unemployed/underemployed, undocumented immigrants, exiting the foster system, racially discriminated, and ect. In order to be able to provide the most competent aid I treated each client as a valuable individual; I made an effort to understand each individual's current circumstances in order to mutually work in gradually overcoming social obstacles. I found that working with the homeless population was a personal challenge; I had a hard time trying to understand how families must feel to be living in the streets, in a car, or in a shelter. I remember working with a soon to be homeless mother of three children, whose husband had just been deported. Although her circumstance was critical I could sense her diminishing distress during the appointment, where she felt she mattered to someone who not only listened and wished to help her. I was disappointed when all we could offer her that day were bags of food that would last her possibly two weeks, due to the lack of funding in the organization. As a result of being confronted with constant situations as these, I was impelled into becoming more knowledgeable on the different types of resources available by different partner organizations. I feel that over time I have become more competent in interacting and helping different types of children and families from diverse backgrounds and circumstances.

I believe the role of a social worker is to serve and empower individuals, groups, and communities, who continue to face social injustice, inequality, and the many shapes and shades of abuse, in order to help restore a greater sense of human and social well-being. To achieve this all-encompassing goal there is the social need to adhere to common social work values that allow for complimentary efforts to be made by all active professionals in the community. There needs to be a shared aspiration towards seeking social justice, being respectful and honest, having a well-rounded empathy for each individual, being competent, appreciating cultural diversity and recognizing the importance of human relationships for a healthy life. I have gradually come to implement these core values through pursuit of becoming a social worker.

Currently I am striving to become a competent Child Welfare Services (CWS) social worker, where I will be capable of personally aiding children who are victims of abuse and neglect. The ability to provide direct support and resources for children and families who are living under difficult and abusive circumstances is something not only ultimately personally rewarding, but something that can foster social change in our community. Each child who suffers abuse is affected in some manner, and regardless of whether the reality or graveness of the abuse is processed, the experience of trauma remains. Assisting children in receiving aid and counseling services promotes personal trauma resilience that gives them the possibility of electing a different healthy lifestyle that the one previously experienced. Child victims of neglect and abuse are able to become healthy members of society; they are able to become social agents of change within their communities.

As a potential MSW graduate student I am interested in analyzing how a child's removal from their home setting influences their trauma resilience, and to what extent different housing placements compare. When a child is removed from the home there is the justification that the decision was made in the best interest of the child. I believe that is a valid reason; however, the wording allows for each choice made to be very subjective. In undertaking this MSW program, I hope to gain a better understanding of the practice methods and services used in the community CWS and partner organizations. In order to be able to have so much influence over the life of an abused and/or neglected child I comprehend that I need to continue my formal education, specifically on the different practice methods that seek primarily the best interest of children.

I am confident that I will continue to be academically successful in obtaining an MSW degree. I have been able to receive consistent grades across all subjects through my undergraduate curriculum. My Sociology major has explored different issues of inequality that are essential to understanding social life. In addition, my Spanish minor has allowed me to refine my Spanish writing technical skills and further my cultural competency. One of my faults as a student in the classroom is my tendency to over analyze material and reserve my thoughts. Although I am attempting to take a more active role in the classroom I have an inclination to make only sparing but thought provoking comments. However, I have the energy and determination to begin learning new relevant social work material and am eager to be exposed to a different community through service learning.

I am prepared to make the necessary arrangements to move to University Park and begin the next stage in my life. I do not have any health conditions or social obligations that would impede my acceptance to your MSW program. I have a genuine interest and passion in becoming an effective and competent social agent of change, by providing support and resources, as a compassionate and empathetic social worker, for children and families.

We hope our collection of UCAS Social Work personal statements provides inspiration for writing your own. Please do not plagiarise them in any way, or UCAS will penalise your application. Our Personal Statement Editing & Review Services are available if you feel you need a little extra help.

If you are applying to university in the USA, please visit Studential.com/us.

Social Work Personal Statement

Prior to my residency in the UK, I have lived in one of the developing countries of Africa-Nigeria- a country where social inequality, poverty, social injustice and lack of respect for human right prevail...

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Social Work Personal Statement

The one thing I have always known I'd like to do with my life is to help people. I'm applying for a course in social work because essentially making a difference in people's lives is the most important aspect of a future career to me, than any other...

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Social Work Personal Statement

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Social Work/Sociology Personal Statement

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Social Work Personal Statement

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Social Studies Personal Statement

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Social Policy & Sociology Personal Statement

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Social Work Personal Statement

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Social Work Personal Statement

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Social Work Personal Statement

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Social Work Personal Statement

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Social Work Personal Statement

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Social Work Personal Statement

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Social Work Personal Statement

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Social Work Personal Statement

I’m applying for the social work course because of my personal experience. I know that being a social worker is very challenging, lot of hard work but a rewarding career all the same. This profession deals with social problems in human relation, empowerment, liberation and well-being of the people you are trying to help...

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