Example Of Harvard Referencing Within An Essay

The example paragraph below demonstrates how to integrate Harvard references into your writing, and how to format a Harvard style reference list.

For more information on how to reference, see the Student Services STUDYSmarter referencing guides, in particular the guides on quoting and paraphrasing. Note that these guides are not Harvard-specific; rather, they provide a general overview on the principles and practices of academic referencing.

 

Peggy Johnson defines collection development as “the thoughtful process of developing a library collection in response to institutional priorities and community or user needs and interests” (Johnson 2009, p. 1). According to Johnson (2009, p. 1), collection development forms part of the broader concept of collection management, which involves “ an expanded suite of decisions about weeding, cancelling serials, storage, and preservation”. Traditional collection development involves selecting individual titles that will best meet the requirements of the library users. In an academic library environment, the selection of titles should primarily support the teaching, learning and research needs of the university staff, students and researchers (University of Western Australia Library 2015). However, the practice of bundling journal titles into one large all-encompassing package has meant that collection development decisions are now often made on a publisher level, rather than on a title-by-title basis (Ball, cited in Carlson & Pope 2009, p. 385). In this sense aggregator packages are similar in nature to monographic blanket orders, where a library agrees to purchase everything that a particular publisher has published (Thompson, Wilder & Button 2000, p. 214). The beauty of these large aggregator packages is that they allow library users to access a vast number of online scholarly resources through the click of a mouse button. 

 

Reference List

Carlson, A & Pope, BM 2009, ‘The “Big Deal”: A survey of how libraries are responding and what the alternatives are’, The Serials
           Librarian
, vol. 57, no. 4, pp. 380-398. Available from: Taylor & Francis Online. [28 September 2015].

Johnson, P 2009, Fundamentals of collection development and management, 2nd edn, ALA Editions, Chicago.

Thompson, K, Wilder, R & Button, L 2000, ‘Impact of bundled databases on serials acquisitions in academic libraries’, The Serials
          Librarian
, vol. 38, no. 3-4, pp. 213-218. Available from: Taylor & Francis Online. [28 September 2015].

University of Western Australia Library 2015, Collection management principles and policies. Available from:
          http://www.library.uwa.edu.au/information-resources/collections/management. [14 October 2015].

In-text references or citations are used to acknowledge the work or ideas of others. They are placed next to the text that you have paraphrased or quoted, enabling the reader to differentiate between your writing and other people’s work.  The full details of your in-text references must be included in a reference list. 

When presenting ideas or information from a source, include the author’s surname and date of publication in brackets within the text of your writing, e.g. These skills need to be developed over time (Veit & Gould  2010). 

Where you refer to the author’s name in the body of the text, include the date of publication in brackets, e.g. 
Young, Rudin-Brown and Lenne (2010) suggest  increased penalties and driver education as  two possible strategies. 

When quoting directly from the source include the page number if available and place quotation marks around the quote, e.g. 
The World Health Organisation (2011, p. 8) defines driver distraction ‘as when some kind of triggering event external to the driver results in the driver shifting attention away from the driving task’.

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